Tag Archives: D3

Rich mans gain/game?

We know athletes these days are getting bigger, faster and stronger. Unfortunately so do all the for profit companies ready to take your hard earned monies. Yes the pay to play all star games that are meaningless as it is not the best available athletes that play in these games. Just families that can afford to pay to attend. In addition to these marketing companies telling you how great you are they also sell your information to other companies like trainers, recruiting services, combine companies and subscription based entities. The common denominator is like the internet phishing, yes fishing to take monies out of your account on a monthly basis and offer little to no impact on your athlete. Many of these companies will tell you it is about exposure or that numerous college coaches that will be on hand to evaluate your athlete. The fact is many college coaches want athletes to attend their own camps and if you put the effort into them, they will evaluate you. So attending 40 camps and everything under the sun is really about being a “Selfie” and no one really cares if you attend 40 camps. Yes you can post it on social media but does anyone really care and does it scare off potential suitors? Imagine if coach ABC likes the athletes film and wants you at his college then sees multiple social media posts from a plethora of other universities. It could impact coach ABC because he figures coach XYZ might trump his efforts in the long evaluation process. Figuring out the evaluation process is fairly easy. The Varsity film, transcripts and attending the school of interests event like a junior day or camp is probably a path to success. Attending multiple events because you have the financial resources is like that little league coach that pumps his chest about his kids and has no regard for the other team members or their families success’. Too much individualism has occurred over the past 6-7 years and the team aspect has dwindled. So the rich mans gain has become his game of getting hustled on a daily basis. Yes eventually if you attend 40 events someone will notice you. However, for the vast majority it will be the student athlete that has a high score on the college board tests of ACT or ACT, a higher than average GPA and yes the varsity film that shows athleticism. So when you receive that email, social media tag or someone reaches out to you that is NOT a college coach just think about it and ask, is this in my best interest or are they hustling me? If you are a rich man and want to plan the game just remember do not wear an article of clothing from another camp or trainer to a college campus, rather wear your high school gear so the coaches can identify you and associate you with a high school. Most likely the college coaches know your head coach and can gain the necessary information to move forward of extending an offer. It is NOT a Rich mans gain/game unless you make it one. Trust the process!

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The Ones That Got Away

The Ones That Got Away
The Best Colorado High School Football Players To Go Out-of-State
Monday, February 22, 2016

By Joe Landers

Over the last 25 years, Colorado has lost a number of its best in-state high school football players to out-of-state programs. The intention here is to compile a list of the best who got away. These are Colorado high schoolers who went on to highly productive college or pro careers. On the surface, it’s hard to imagine why one of the equivalent in-state schools couldn’t have kept the player in-state. Going deeper, there are probably very valid reasons in every case as to why the player left the state.

Maybe Calais Campbell was headed to Miami regardless of who offered him. Is it possible that Gary Barnett didn’t want 5’6” Cory Ross and Colorado was the only viable in-state option for Ross at the time? (Ross went on to play for the Ravens.) Maybe the Denney brothers saw no in-state alternative to BYU. (Both went on to play in the NFL.) It could be that Cole Manhart grew two inches and 60 pounds after he got to Kearney. (He was PSq’d by the Raiders in 2015.) I’m guessing McCartney and Bruce felt good enough about their QB options (and their option offenses) that Musgrave never got a sniff in-state.

It’s hard to imagine each of the below future NFLers not making CU, CSU, and Air Force better. There are so many mitigating circumstances that affect every single recruit decision to leave the state and so many reasons every single evaluation by in-state coaching staffs result in them not pursuing an in-state recruit – changing coaching staffs, recruit wants to be somewhere warm, playing time, bigger stage, better alternatives, scheme, the list goes on and on. Is there an equivalent in-state option to Michigan for Carlo Kemp? Only he, his family, and the in-state coaching staffs know if it was ever realistic. Was there a viable in-state alternative for JoJo Domann? Could CU or CSU have done anything to keep Matt Lynch from leaving for UCLA? Did the CU or CSU staffs feel like they had better alternatives to each or did they put their all into keeping this year’s cream of the crop? (For the record, even these three high school greats aren’t on this list because they haven’t done anything in college yet.)

The key assumption with regards to the lists you’ll see below is that each of them could’ve made their in-state equivalent better. It was their choice to leave, the in-state college coaches’ choice to let them walk, or a combination thereof. For example, while he’s a lesser known name, Eaglecrest FS Aaron Swift had a great career at South Dakota from 2010-2014. His in-state equivalent would’ve been Northern Colorado. It’s probably not a stretch to say he would’ve been an upgrade for UNC – Swift led USD in PBUs twice, had a 60-yd pick-six, and started four years in a row (>75% of USD’s games). Thinking of big names, Lamarr Houston’s only in-state options comparable to Texas in 2007 were Colorado State and Colorado – if either could’ve found a way to keep him, he would’ve made both considerably better. Another lesser known name would be Tommy Connors. Like Swift, he never played in the NFL, but he was an outstanding three-year starting SS at Southeastern Louisiana. Northern Colorado was his only in-state comp at the time. Connors led SELa in TFLs, tackles, INTs, and FFs at various points in his career. There’s no question he would’ve made UNC better from 2007-2010.

You’ll see three lists below. The first is of those who have completed their college eligibility and would’ve offered a considerable upgrade for their in-state equivalents. The second is of those who just completed their eligibility this season and concluded an outstanding college career on the field. Lastly, the third is of those who are still in college and based on their on-field production so far, there’s no question they would’ve provided an upgrade at their equivalent P5 school (CU), their equivalent non-P5 I-A school (CSU/AFA), their equivalent I-AA school (UNC), or their equivalent D2 school (Pueblo, Mesa, Adams State, Western, Fort Lewis, Mines). Each list is sorted by their last year of college eligibility.

College Eligibility Completed Before 2016 – Colorado H.S. Football Players

In almost every case on the above list, whether they played at USC or Nebraska-Kearney, the future NFLers on the list would’ve made CU or CSU better. In most cases, even those that didn’t play in the NFL had such great college careers (e.g., Connors, Swift, Preston, Rufran, Theret) that they also would’ve been upgrades for their in-state equivalents.

College Eligibility Completed In 2016 – The Best from Colorado Who Played Out-of-State

The bar is high here. LT Clarke (6’3/295) started four years in a row at tackle for Hawaii. (Starting over 75% of the team’s game qualifies as a year started.) WR McCaffrey (6’2/195) started three of his four years at Duke. DE Yarbrough (6’3/251) not only started three of his four years at Wyoming, but he led the team in sacks all four years, led the team in TFLs three years, led the team in FRs and FFs in 2013, and led the team in QBHs in 2014. To say he has a high motor and is active would be an understatement. DT Sheridan (6’4/280) started his final two years at Montana State, led the team in FFs in 2014, and led the team in QBHs and blocked kicks in 2015. DE Obi (6’3/250) started his two years at Missouri Western State after a CC xfer. CB Brown (6’1/185) started two of his four years at Augustana (SD), lettered all four, led the team in INTs twice, and led the team in PBUs in 2013.

Between I-A, I-AA, and II-A, there are 35 more Colorado high school players who are concluding their athletic eligibility by May 2016. I don’t know if the other 35 started out more highly ranked, but these six clearly stand out based on their on-field productivity in college.

College Eligibility Remaining – The Best from Colorado Playing Out-of-State

The bar is also incredibly high to make this list. OL Skipper (6’10/331) has started at right and left tackle in two of his three seasons at Arkansas. OG Kozan (6’4/300) has started two of his three seasons at Guard for Auburn. Many may scoff at Eastern New Mexico, but WR Johnson (6’5/190) has started three seasons in a row (no redshirt year) and he’s been explosive with TD catches of 70, 73, and 78 yards. RB Christian McCaffrey (6’0/201) needs no introduction. P J.K. Scott (6’5/198) has started two years in a row for Alabama and is widely regarded as one of the top punters in the country. OL Cummings (6’6/314) started most of his RS Fr year in 2014 and all of 2015 at left tackle for Wyoming. RB Paris (5’10/198) has started his first two years in a row at Black Hills State and shown breakaway speed with a 64-yd TD catch. FS Wingard started every game as a true freshman for Wyoming in 2015, led the team in tackles, and made the national FWAA All-Freshman team. There are 227 more former Colorado high school footballers playing at the I-A, I-AA, and II-A levels out-of-state. There may be others who have reached heights similar to what these eight have so far in college. If we’ve missed someone, please let us know.

Conclusion

Part of the issue with keeping recruits in Colorado is limited choices. We’re not Ohio where there are 30 options: eight I-A choices (1 P5, 7 non-P5), two I-AA, nine II-A, and eleven III-A. We’re not California or Florida with seven I-A options and four I-AA options. We’re not North Carolina with six I-A, eight I-AA, and thirteen II-A options. We’re Colorado. One P5 option, two non-P5 I-A options (one of which is Air Force), one I-AA option, and six D2 options – 10 total. See how we compare in terms of in-state options to keep stars in-state.

College Football Schools – By State, Divisions I-A, I-AA, and II-A (FBS, FCS, and D2)

In Colorado, it sure looks like we’re in the same boat as Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oregon, and Utah – two or less (viable) I-A options and very few I-AA/D2 options. I have to believe the sentiments about keeping kids in-state is very similar in those states.

Of the many reasons in-state recruits don’t stay, I would guess that part of it’s that young men want to see different parts of the country and explore beyond Colorado. Some want to be part of the pomp and circumstance in the SEC. Maybe some want to return to a state where they lived as a kid (e.g., Montana). Others might want to see what it’s like to live in California. Regardless of the recruit reasons or the college coach reasons, if you’re pulling for any in-state teams, it’s extremely frustrating to hear stories of great local high school players not even getting a call from CU, CSU, UNC, Pueblo, Mesa, Adams State, Fort Lewis, or Western. (I’d put Air Force and Mines on a different scale due to the rigorous academics and clearly defined career trajectory.)

To see college football wallow in its current state here in Colorado is not easy. To watch the best talent leave means that there’s likely no end in sight any time soon. How can it be cheaper to offer a full ride to some kid from Louisiana compared to a local kid? It seems like the money would go further with local kids, but maybe that’s oversimplifying the finances of building with out-of-state talent. Hopefully, going forward, in-state college coaches will find a way to keep the best Colorado recruits and allow local fans to pull for a local winning team composed of local recruits.

Recruiting 101 & Eligibility Center

Recruiting 101

Over the last several years the dynamics of athletic recruiting has changed dramatically. Numerous factors contribute to these changes.  Due to the mass amount of change in recruiting, there are unlimited amounts of information and services available to student athletes and their families.  It has become increasingly more difficult for players, families and coaches to sort through all of the information to decide what is actually useful and productive.

In addition to the professional film, recruiting and consulting services provided by 303Gonzo.com, our former athletes, existing athletes and coaches have taken the time to simplify the recruiting process for you.  Having a great film and visibility is only part of the battle that you will face in the recruiting process.  Our experience with this process has led us to share some of the most frequent questions and obstacles that you may encounter.

Perception:  “If a player is good enough, college coaches will find him/her.”

Reality:  This is only true if you are one of the best players in the country or if you happen to be fortunate enough for a coach to happen upon you.  The vast majority of high school athletes need advanced exposure.  This statement is also used by some high school and club coaches.  DO NOT accept this as the answer to your child’s future.

Perception:   “My coach is doing my film and recruiting.  That’s all I need.”

Reality:  It is always great to have a coach that is helping in the process.  However, it is very difficult to expect our coaches to be responsible for the entire process to go along with coaching, teaching and personal duties as well.  Once they see how effective the303Gonzo.com, process is for their student athletes, most coaches have been more than thrilled with the results.

Perception:   “A college coach only wants to see my film if they already contacted me or had me at their camp.”

Reality:  Colleges and Universities want to see film on every quality player that is available to them.  Some players are found at on campus camps.  However, considering the number of programs across that country, the vast majority of players that sign each year are found outside of camps and coach contact.  Coaches are film junkies.  Make sure that you are seen by as many coaches as you possibly can reach.

Perception:  “I am getting letters from schools already.  I don’t need help.”

Reality:  Getting letters in the mail each day is great.  But, at the end of the day, that letter is more than likely one of hundreds that particular college or university sent out that day.  If a letter is not personally written, it may be one of thousands that were generated from their mailing list.  Outside of the periods where coach contact is limited, you should be getting personal contact via phone call, text, email and more from interested schools.

 

Perception:   “If I don’t sign with a D-I school, I must not be very good.”

Reality:  This statement could not be further from the truth.  Fact is: there are very few student athletes that are lucky enough to get the opportunity to sign with a Division I program.  However, the quality of education and athletic play provided by non-Division I programs is fantastic.  In many cases, student athletes find a better athletic and academic fit at Division II, Division III, NAIA and JUCO programs.

REVIEW

The Perceptions and obstacles above represent just a few of the hurdles that student athletes face in the recruiting process.  If you have questions that are not listed, please feel free to Contact Us to discuss your specific question.

Also, be sure to visit our Eligibility Center.  No matter how good of a player that you have become or how great your film looks, you must take the steps to be academically cleared to participate in the intercollegiate activity that you have chosen.

Eligibility Center

                 The process of gaining eligibility to a NCAA Division I or II program can be very confusing for Student Athletes and Parents (each NCAA Division III program sets its own admission regulations).  PrepsNation is dedicated to helping make this process just a little easier.  To learn more about NCAA eligibility, visit the link below.  (NCAA Clearinghouse information is covered below)

NCAA Eligibility Center – CLICK HERE

When looking to gain admission to an NAIA program, there are several differences when compared to NCAA admissions standards.  NAIA student athlete eligibility can be gained by meeting 2 of the 3 following standards: 1. Overall GPA of 2.0 or higher  2. ACT of 18 or higher (composite score) / SAT of 860 or higher (2 part only)  3. Class Ranking anywhere in the top half.  To learn more about NAIA eligibility, visit the link below.  (NAIA Registration information is covered below)

NAIA Eligibility Center – CLICK HERE

ACT test scores can be used for gaining eligibility for NCAA or NAIA sports programs.  To learn more about ACT test dates and information, visit the link below.

ACT Testing Information – CLICK HERE

SAT test scores can be used for gaining eligibility for NCAA or NAIA sports programs.  To learn more about SAT test dates and information, visit the link below.

SAT Testing Information – CLICK HERE

Any student athlete that is seeking to gain eligibility to an NCAA Division I or Division II program must be registered with the NCAA Clearinghouse.  To learn more about the NCAA Clearinghouse, visit the link below.

NCAA Clearinghouse Information – CLICK HERE

Any student athlete that is seeking to gain eligibility to an NAIA program must be register with NAIA.  To learn more about PLAY NAIA, visit the link below.

PLAY NAIA Information – CLICK HERE